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Haskell
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Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. Product Description Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. This edition includes new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts – such as simple data types and input/output – are presented at an earlier stage. Features + Benefits Emphasises software engineering principles. Encourages a disciplined approach to building reusable libraries of software components. Case studies are used throughout the book to introduce new ideas, illustrate important concepts, and demonstrate how existing techniques work together. Case studies include: An interactive calculator programme. A coding and decoding system. A small queue simulation package. Companion website contains supporting material (such as visualisation tools and a substantial number of web links) to aid further study. Appendices contain information on Hugs errors. Backcover The third edition of Haskell: The Craft of Functional Programming is essential reading for beginners to functional programming and newcomers to the Haskell programming language. The emphasis is on the process of crafting programs and the text contains many examples and running case studies, as well as advice on program design, testing, problem solving and how to avoid common pitfalls. Revisions to this new edition include new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts - such as simple data types and input/output - are presented at an earlier stage. The running example of Pictures is now implemented using web browser graphics as well as lists of strings. The book uses GHCi, the interactive version of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler, as its implementation of choice. It has also been revised to include material about the Haskell Platform, and the Hackage online database of Haskell libraries. In particular, readers are given detailed guidance about how to find their way around what is available in these systems. An accompanying web site supports the book, containing all the program code, further teaching materials and other useful resources. Simon Thompson is Professor of Logic and Computation in the School of Computing at the University of Kent. His research and teaching interests include functional programming and logical aspects of computer science. Simon has written three other books: Erlang Programming (co-authored with Francesco Cesarini), Miranda: The Craft of Functional Programming and Type Theory and Functional Programming. Preface 1 Introducing functional programming 1.1 Computers and modelling 1.2 What is a function? 1.3 Pictures and functions 1.4 Types 1.5 The Haskell programming language 1.6 Expressions and evaluation 1.7 Definitions 1.8 Function definitions 1.9 Types and functional programming 1.10 Calculation and evaluation 1.11 The essence of Haskell programming 1.12 Domain-specific languages 1.13 Two models of Pictures 1.14 Tests, properties and proofs 2 Getting started with Haskell and GHCi 2.1 A first Haskell program 2.2 Using Haskell in practice 2.3 Using GHCi 2.4 The standard prelude and the Haskell libraries 2.5 Modules 2.6 A second example: Pictures 2.7 Errors and error messages 3 Basic types and definitions 3.1 The Booleans: Bool 3.2 The integers: Integer and Int 3.3 Overloading 3.4 Guards 3.5 Characters and strings 3.6 Floating-point numbers: Float 3.7 Syntax 4 Designing and writing programs 4.1 Where do I start? Designing a program in Haskell 4.2 Solving a problem in steps: local definitions 4.3 Defining types for ourselves: enumerated types 4.4 Recursion 4.5 Primitive recursion in practice 4.6 Extended exercise: pictures 4.7 General forms of recursion 4.8 Program testing 5 Data types, tuples and lists 5.1 Introducing tuples and lists 5.2 Tuple types 5.3 Introducing algebraic types 5.4 Our approach to lists 5.5 Lists in Haskell 5.6 List comprehensions 5.7 A library database 6 Programming with lists 6.1 Generic functions: polymorphism 6.2 Haskell list functions in the Prelude 6.3 Finding your way around the Haskell libraries 6.4 The Picture example: implementation 6.5 Extended exercise: alternative implementations of pictures 6.6 Extended exercise: positioned pictures 6.7 Extended exercise: supermarket billing 6.8 Extended exercise: cards and card games 7 Defining functions over lists 7.1 Pattern matching revisited 7.2 Lists and list patterns 7.3 Primitive recursion over lists 7.4 Finding primitive recursive definitions 7.5 General recursions over lists 7.6 Example: text processing 8 Playing the game: I/O in Haskell 8.1 Rock - Paper - Scissors: strategies 8.2 Why is I/O an issue? 8.3 The basics of input/output 8.4 The do notation 8.5 Loops and recursion 8.6 Rock - Paper - Scissors: playing the game 9 Reasoning about programs 9.1 Understanding definitions 9.2 Testing and proof 9.3 Definedness, termination and finiteness 9.4 A little logic 9.6 Further examples of proofs by induction 9.7 Generalizing the proof goal 10 Generalization: patterns of computation 10.1 Patterns of computation over lists 10.2 Higher-order functions: functions as arguments 10.3 Folding and primitive recursion 10.4 Generalizing: splitting up lists 10.5 Case studies revisited 11 Higher-order functions 11.1 Operators: function composition and application 11.2 Expressions for functions: lambda abstractions 11.3 Partial application 11.4 Under the hood: curried functions 11.5 Defining higher-order functions 11.6 Verification and general functions 12 Developing higher-order programs 12.1 Revisiting the Picture example 12.2 Functions as data: strategy combinators 12.3 Functions as data: recognising regular expressions 12.4 Case studies: functions as data 12.5 Example: creating an index 12.6 Development in practice 12.7 Understanding programs 13 Overloading, type classes and type checking 13.1 Why overloading? 13.2 Introducing classes 13.3 Signatures and instances 13.4 A tour of the built-in Haskell classes 13.5 Type checking and type inference: an overview 13.6 Monomorphic type checking 13.7 Polymorphic type checking 13.8 Type checking and classes 14 Algebraic types 14.1 Algebraic type definitions revisited 14.2 Recursive algebraic types 14.3 Polymorphic algebraic types 14.4 Modelling program errors 14.5 Design with algebraic data types 14.6 Algebraic types and type classes 14.7 Reasoning about algebraic types 15 Case study: Huffman codes 15.1 Modules in Haskell 15.2 Modular design 15.3 Coding and decoding 15.4 Implementation – I 15.5 Building Huffman trees 15.6 Design 15.7 Implementation – II 16 Abstract data types 16.1 Type representations 16.2 The Haskell abstract data type mechanism 16.3 Queues 16.4 Design 16.5 Simulation 16.6 Implementing the simulation 16.7 Search trees 16.8 Sets 16.9 Relations and graphs 16.10 Commentary 17 Lazy programming 17.1 Lazy evaluation 17.2 Calculation rules and lazy evaluation 17.3 List comprehensions revisited 17.4 Data-directed programming 17.5 Case study: parsing expressions 17.6 Infinite lists 17.7 Why infinite lists? 17.8 Case study: simulation 17.9 Proof revisited 18 Programming with monads 18.1 I/O programming 18.2 Further I/O 18.3 The calculator 18.4 The do notation revisited 18.5 Monads: languages for functional programming 18.6 Example: monadic computation over trees 19 Domain-Specific Languages 19.1 Programming languages everywhere 19.2 Why DSLs in Haskell? 19.3 Shallow and deep Embeddings 19.4 A DSL for regular expressions 19.5 Monadic DSLs 19.6 DSLs for computation: generating data in QuickCheck 19.7 Taking it further 20 Time and space behaviour 20.1 Complexity of functions 20.2 The complexity of calculations 20.3 Implementations of sets 20.4 Space behaviour 20.5 Folding revisited 20.6 Avoiding recomputation: memoization 21 Conclusion Appendices A Functional, imperative and 00 programming B Glossary C Haskell operators D Haskell practicalities E GHCi errors F Project ideas BibliographyIntroducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 04.04.2020
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Haskell
69,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. Product Description Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. This edition includes new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts – such as simple data types and input/output – are presented at an earlier stage. Features + Benefits Emphasises software engineering principles. Encourages a disciplined approach to building reusable libraries of software components. Case studies are used throughout the book to introduce new ideas, illustrate important concepts, and demonstrate how existing techniques work together. Case studies include: An interactive calculator programme. A coding and decoding system. A small queue simulation package. Companion website contains supporting material (such as visualisation tools and a substantial number of web links) to aid further study. Appendices contain information on Hugs errors. Backcover The third edition of Haskell: The Craft of Functional Programming is essential reading for beginners to functional programming and newcomers to the Haskell programming language. The emphasis is on the process of crafting programs and the text contains many examples and running case studies, as well as advice on program design, testing, problem solving and how to avoid common pitfalls. Revisions to this new edition include new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts - such as simple data types and input/output - are presented at an earlier stage. The running example of Pictures is now implemented using web browser graphics as well as lists of strings. The book uses GHCi, the interactive version of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler, as its implementation of choice. It has also been revised to include material about the Haskell Platform, and the Hackage online database of Haskell libraries. In particular, readers are given detailed guidance about how to find their way around what is available in these systems. An accompanying web site supports the book, containing all the program code, further teaching materials and other useful resources. Simon Thompson is Professor of Logic and Computation in the School of Computing at the University of Kent. His research and teaching interests include functional programming and logical aspects of computer science. Simon has written three other books: Erlang Programming (co-authored with Francesco Cesarini), Miranda: The Craft of Functional Programming and Type Theory and Functional Programming. Preface 1 Introducing functional programming 1.1 Computers and modelling 1.2 What is a function? 1.3 Pictures and functions 1.4 Types 1.5 The Haskell programming language 1.6 Expressions and evaluation 1.7 Definitions 1.8 Function definitions 1.9 Types and functional programming 1.10 Calculation and evaluation 1.11 The essence of Haskell programming 1.12 Domain-specific languages 1.13 Two models of Pictures 1.14 Tests, properties and proofs 2 Getting started with Haskell and GHCi 2.1 A first Haskell program 2.2 Using Haskell in practice 2.3 Using GHCi 2.4 The standard prelude and the Haskell libraries 2.5 Modules 2.6 A second example: Pictures 2.7 Errors and error messages 3 Basic types and definitions 3.1 The Booleans: Bool 3.2 The integers: Integer and Int 3.3 Overloading 3.4 Guards 3.5 Characters and strings 3.6 Floating-point numbers: Float 3.7 Syntax 4 Designing and writing programs 4.1 Where do I start? Designing a program in Haskell 4.2 Solving a problem in steps: local definitions 4.3 Defining types for ourselves: enumerated types 4.4 Recursion 4.5 Primitive recursion in practice 4.6 Extended exercise: pictures 4.7 General forms of recursion 4.8 Program testing 5 Data types, tuples and lists 5.1 Introducing tuples and lists 5.2 Tuple types 5.3 Introducing algebraic types 5.4 Our approach to lists 5.5 Lists in Haskell 5.6 List comprehensions 5.7 A library database 6 Programming with lists 6.1 Generic functions: polymorphism 6.2 Haskell list functions in the Prelude 6.3 Finding your way around the Haskell libraries 6.4 The Picture example: implementation 6.5 Extended exercise: alternative implementations of pictures 6.6 Extended exercise: positioned pictures 6.7 Extended exercise: supermarket billing 6.8 Extended exercise: cards and card games 7 Defining functions over lists 7.1 Pattern matching revisited 7.2 Lists and list patterns 7.3 Primitive recursion over lists 7.4 Finding primitive recursive definitions 7.5 General recursions over lists 7.6 Example: text processing 8 Playing the game: I/O in Haskell 8.1 Rock - Paper - Scissors: strategies 8.2 Why is I/O an issue? 8.3 The basics of input/output 8.4 The do notation 8.5 Loops and recursion 8.6 Rock - Paper - Scissors: playing the game 9 Reasoning about programs 9.1 Understanding definitions 9.2 Testing and proof 9.3 Definedness, termination and finiteness 9.4 A little logic 9.6 Further examples of proofs by induction 9.7 Generalizing the proof goal 10 Generalization: patterns of computation 10.1 Patterns of computation over lists 10.2 Higher-order functions: functions as arguments 10.3 Folding and primitive recursion 10.4 Generalizing: splitting up lists 10.5 Case studies revisited 11 Higher-order functions 11.1 Operators: function composition and application 11.2 Expressions for functions: lambda abstractions 11.3 Partial application 11.4 Under the hood: curried functions 11.5 Defining higher-order functions 11.6 Verification and general functions 12 Developing higher-order programs 12.1 Revisiting the Picture example 12.2 Functions as data: strategy combinators 12.3 Functions as data: recognising regular expressions 12.4 Case studies: functions as data 12.5 Example: creating an index 12.6 Development in practice 12.7 Understanding programs 13 Overloading, type classes and type checking 13.1 Why overloading? 13.2 Introducing classes 13.3 Signatures and instances 13.4 A tour of the built-in Haskell classes 13.5 Type checking and type inference: an overview 13.6 Monomorphic type checking 13.7 Polymorphic type checking 13.8 Type checking and classes 14 Algebraic types 14.1 Algebraic type definitions revisited 14.2 Recursive algebraic types 14.3 Polymorphic algebraic types 14.4 Modelling program errors 14.5 Design with algebraic data types 14.6 Algebraic types and type classes 14.7 Reasoning about algebraic types 15 Case study: Huffman codes 15.1 Modules in Haskell 15.2 Modular design 15.3 Coding and decoding 15.4 Implementation – I 15.5 Building Huffman trees 15.6 Design 15.7 Implementation – II 16 Abstract data types 16.1 Type representations 16.2 The Haskell abstract data type mechanism 16.3 Queues 16.4 Design 16.5 Simulation 16.6 Implementing the simulation 16.7 Search trees 16.8 Sets 16.9 Relations and graphs 16.10 Commentary 17 Lazy programming 17.1 Lazy evaluation 17.2 Calculation rules and lazy evaluation 17.3 List comprehensions revisited 17.4 Data-directed programming 17.5 Case study: parsing expressions 17.6 Infinite lists 17.7 Why infinite lists? 17.8 Case study: simulation 17.9 Proof revisited 18 Programming with monads 18.1 I/O programming 18.2 Further I/O 18.3 The calculator 18.4 The do notation revisited 18.5 Monads: languages for functional programming 18.6 Example: monadic computation over trees 19 Domain-Specific Languages 19.1 Programming languages everywhere 19.2 Why DSLs in Haskell? 19.3 Shallow and deep Embeddings 19.4 A DSL for regular expressions 19.5 Monadic DSLs 19.6 DSLs for computation: generating data in QuickCheck 19.7 Taking it further 20 Time and space behaviour 20.1 Complexity of functions 20.2 The complexity of calculations 20.3 Implementations of sets 20.4 Space behaviour 20.5 Folding revisited 20.6 Avoiding recomputation: memoization 21 Conclusion Appendices A Functional, imperative and 00 programming B Glossary C Haskell operators D Haskell practicalities E GHCi errors F Project ideas BibliographyIntroducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 04.04.2020
Zum Angebot
Kerberos Saga
34,00 € *
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Kerberos Saga is a military science fiction franchise and alternate history universe created by the Japanese writer and filmmaker Mamoru Oshii in 1986. The saga is centered around the fictitious Tokyo police Special Armed Garrison which emblem and nickname is Kerberos (a.k.a. Cerberus), the mythological three-headed watchdog of hell. Before it was officially renamed "Kerberos Saga" circa 2004, it was known as the "Kerberos series" or the "Kenr series".The franchise is currently owned by Mamoru Oshii and the Barque company, It consists of works based on Oshii's original story spanning in various media including feature films, radio dramas, comic books, animation films and monographs. Licensed products are mainly Special Armed Garrison powered suit based action figures or garage kits, called Protect Gears, and Kerberos Saga episodes derived soundtracks, storyboards and guidebooks. Merchandising includes posters, folding fans, mousepads, statuette busts, tee-shirts and even bottles of wine with a dedicated online shop available on the official website.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 04.04.2020
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Introduction to Proteins
107,10 € *
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Introduction to Proteins provides acomprehensiveand state-of-the-art introduction to the structure, function, and motion of proteins for students, faculty, and researchers at all levels.The book coversproteins and enzymesacross a wide range ofcontexts and applications, including medical disorders, drugs, toxins, chemical warfare, and animal behavior. Each chapter includes a Summary, Exercies, and References. New features in the thoroughly-updated second edition include: A brand-new chapter on enzymatic catalysis, describing enzyme biochemistry, classification, kinetics, thermodynamics, mechanisms, and applications in medicine and other industries. These are accompanied by multiple animations of biochemical reactions and mechanisms, accessible via embedded QR codes (which can be viewed by smartphones) An in-depth discussion of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) A wider-scale description of biochemical and biophysical methods for studying proteins, including fully accessible internet-based resources, such as databases and algorithms Animations of protein dynamics and conformational changes, accessible via embedded QR codes Additional features Extensive discussion of the energetics of protein folding, stability and interactions A comprehensive view of membrane proteins, with emphasis on structure-function relationship Coverage of intrinsically unstructured proteins, providing a complete, realistic view of the proteome and its underlying functions Exploration of industrial applications of protein engineering and rational drug design Each chapter includes a Summary, Exercies, and References Approximately 300 color images Downloadable solutions manual available at www.crcpress.com For more information, including all presentations, tables, animations, and exercises, as well asa complete teaching course on proteins' structure and function, please visit the author's website: Praise for the first edition "This book captures, in a very accessible way, a growing body of literature on the structure, function and motion of proteins. This is a superb publication that would be very useful to undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and instructors involved in structural biology or biophysics courses or in research on protein structure-function relationships." --David Sheehan, ChemBioChem, 2011 "Introduction to Proteins is an excellent, state-of-the-art choice for students, faculty, or researchers needing a monograph on protein structure. This is an immensely informative, thoroughly researched, up-to-date text, with broad coverage and remarkable depth. Introduction to Proteins would provide an excellent basis for an upper-level or graduate course on protein structure, and a valuable addition to the libraries of professionals interested in this centrally important field." --Eric Martz, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, 2012

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 04.04.2020
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Machine Learning
102,90 € *
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This tutorial text gives a unifying perspective on machine learning by covering both probabilistic and deterministic approaches -which are based on optimization techniques - together with the Bayesian inference approach, whose essence lies in the use of a hierarchy of probabilistic models. The book presents the major machine learning methods as they have been developed in different disciplines, such as statistics, statistical and adaptive signal processing and computer science. Focusing on the physical reasoning behind the mathematics, all the various methods and techniques are explained in depth, supported by examples and problems, giving an invaluable resource to the student and researcher for understanding and applying machine learning concepts.The book builds carefully from the basic classical methods to the most recent trends, with chapters written to be as self-contained as possible, making the text suitable for different courses: pattern recognition, statistical/adaptive signal processing, statistical/Bayesian learning, as well as short courses on sparse modeling, deep learning, and probabilistic graphical models.All major classical techniques: Mean/Least-Squares regression and filtering, Kalman filtering, stochastic approximation and online learning, Bayesian classification, decision trees, logistic regression and boosting methods.The latest trends: Sparsity, convex analysis and optimization, online distributed algorithms, learning in RKH spaces, Bayesian inference, graphical and hidden Markov models, particle filtering, deep learning, dictionary learning and latent variables modeling.Case studies - protein folding prediction, optical character recognition, text authorship identification, fMRI data analysis, change point detection, hyperspectral image unmixing, target localization, channel equalization and echo cancellation, show how the theory can be applied.MATLAB code for all the main algorithms are available on an accompanying website, enabling the reader to experiment with the code.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 04.04.2020
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Machine Learning
122,00 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

This tutorial text gives a unifying perspective on machine learning by covering both probabilistic and deterministic approaches -which are based on optimization techniques - together with the Bayesian inference approach, whose essence lies in the use of a hierarchy of probabilistic models. The book presents the major machine learning methods as they have been developed in different disciplines, such as statistics, statistical and adaptive signal processing and computer science. Focusing on the physical reasoning behind the mathematics, all the various methods and techniques are explained in depth, supported by examples and problems, giving an invaluable resource to the student and researcher for understanding and applying machine learning concepts. The book builds carefully from the basic classical methods to the most recent trends, with chapters written to be as self-contained as possible, making the text suitable for different courses: pattern recognition, statistical/adaptive signal processing, statistical/Bayesian learning, as well as short courses on sparse modeling, deep learning, and probabilistic graphical models. All major classical techniques: Mean/Least-Squares regression and filtering, Kalman filtering, stochastic approximation and online learning, Bayesian classification, decision trees, logistic regression and boosting methods. The latest trends: Sparsity, convex analysis and optimization, online distributed algorithms, learning in RKH spaces, Bayesian inference, graphical and hidden Markov models, particle filtering, deep learning, dictionary learning and latent variables modeling. Case studies - protein folding prediction, optical character recognition, text authorship identification, fMRI data analysis, change point detection, hyperspectral image unmixing, target localization, channel equalization and echo cancellation, show how the theory can be applied. MATLAB code for all the main algorithms are available on an accompanying website, enabling the reader to experiment with the code.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 04.04.2020
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The Gospel in a Pagan Society
17,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

In over thirty engagingly written and illustrated pieces Peter Jeffery applies the good news of the Christian faith and teaching in a way you and others will love reading about it. These tracts are supplied on three formats PDFs US letter size for folding and UK A4 size for folding and as HTML text so you can load them on your website. Purchase of this CD licenses you or your church or your Christian organization to print and distribute as many of these tracts as you wish and to publish and circulate them electronically by email or on the world wide web.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 04.04.2020
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Aitchison, M: Caught in the Crossfire
11,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

In over thirty engagingly written and illustrated pieces Peter Jeffery applies the good news of the Christian faith and teaching in a way you and others will love reading about it. These tracts are supplied on three formats PDFs US letter size for folding and UK A4 size for folding and as HTML text so you can load them on your website. Purchase of this CD licenses you or your church or your Christian organization to print and distribute as many of these tracts as you wish and to publish and circulate them electronically by email or on the world wide web.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 04.04.2020
Zum Angebot
Mathematical Aspects of Fluid Mechanics
110,00 CHF *
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'The rigorous mathematical theory of the equations of fluid dynamics has been a focus of intense activity in recent years. This volume is the product of a workshop held at the University of Warwick to consolidate, survey and further advance the subject. The Navier-Stokes equations feature prominently: the reader will find new results concerning feedback stabilisation, stretching and folding, and decay in norm of solutions to these fundamental equations of fluid motion. Other topics covered include new models for turbulent energy cascade, existence and uniqueness results for complex fluids and certain interesting solutions of the SQG equation. The result is an accessible collection of survey articles and more traditional research papers that will serve both as a helpful overview for graduate students new to the area and as a useful resource for more established researchers.'--Publisher's website.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 04.04.2020
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