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Raspberry Pi For Dummies (eBook, ePUB)
16,99 € *
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Embrace the exciting new technology of Raspberry Pi! With the invention of the unique credit-card sized single-board computer, the Raspberry Pi, comes a new wave of hardware geeks, hackers, and hobbyists who are excited about the possibilities of the Raspberry Pi, and this is the perfect guide to get you started in this exhilarating new arena. With this fun and friendly book, you'll quickly discover why the supply for the Pi cannot keep up with the demand! Veteran tech authors Sean McManus and Mike Cook show you how to download and install the operating system, use the installed applications, and much more. Covers connecting the Pi to other devices such as a keyboard, mouse, monitor, and more Teaches you basic Linux System Admin Walks you through editing images, creating web pages, and playing music Details how to program with Scratch and Python Explores creating simple hardware projects Raspberry Pi For Dummies makes computing as easy as pie. Now discover the history of Raspberry Pi! The Raspberry Pi sold a million units in its first year, and came from a previously unknown organisation, The Raspberry Pi Foundation. If you ve ever wondered how it came into being, and what inspired its creation, Sean McManus, co-author of Raspberry Pi For Dummies, has the answer. He has set up a section on his website to share bonus content, which includes a short history of the Raspberry Pi. At Sean s website, you can also read reviews of the book, see videos of its projects, and read several exclusive blog posts about the Raspberry Pi and its community. Visit Sean s homepage for Raspberry Pi For Dummies here!

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Effectual Entrepreneurship
48,99 € *
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What are you waiting for? Whether you're dreaming about starting a business, learning about entrepreneurship or on the brink of creating a new opportunity right now, don't wait. Open this updated bestseller. Inside you'll find everything you need, including: anew andpopular way to learn about and to practice entrepreneurship. new practical exercises, questions and activities for each step in your process. specific principles derived from the methods of expert entrepreneurs. over seventyupdatedcase briefs of entrepreneurs across industries, locations and time. new applications to social entrepreneurship, technology and tolarge enterprises. plentiful connections to current and foundational research in the field (Research Roots) brand new chapter on "The Ask" - strategies for initiating the process of co-creating with partners data that will challenge conventional entrepreneurship wisdom abroader perspective on the science of entrepreneurship In this vibrant updated edition, you will find these ideas presented in the concise, modular, graphical form made popular in the first edition, perfect for those learning to be entrepreneurs or those already in the thick of things. If you want to learn about entrepreneurship in a way that emphasizes action, this new edition is vital reading. If you have already launched your entrepreneurial career and are looking for new perspectives, take the effectual entrepreneurship challenge! this book is for you. If you feel that you are no longer creating anything novel or valuable in your day job, and you're wondering how to change things, this book is for you. Anyone using entrepreneurship to create the change they want to see in the world will find a wealth of thought-provoking material, expert advice and practical techniques in these pages and on the accompanying website: www.effectuation.org So, what are you waiting for?

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Stand: 06.04.2020
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Effectual Entrepreneurship
48,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

What are you waiting for? Whether you're dreaming about starting a business, learning about entrepreneurship or on the brink of creating a new opportunity right now, don't wait. Open this updated bestseller. Inside you'll find everything you need, including: anew andpopular way to learn about and to practice entrepreneurship. new practical exercises, questions and activities for each step in your process. specific principles derived from the methods of expert entrepreneurs. over seventyupdatedcase briefs of entrepreneurs across industries, locations and time. new applications to social entrepreneurship, technology and tolarge enterprises. plentiful connections to current and foundational research in the field (Research Roots) brand new chapter on "The Ask" - strategies for initiating the process of co-creating with partners data that will challenge conventional entrepreneurship wisdom abroader perspective on the science of entrepreneurship In this vibrant updated edition, you will find these ideas presented in the concise, modular, graphical form made popular in the first edition, perfect for those learning to be entrepreneurs or those already in the thick of things. If you want to learn about entrepreneurship in a way that emphasizes action, this new edition is vital reading. If you have already launched your entrepreneurial career and are looking for new perspectives, take the effectual entrepreneurship challenge! this book is for you. If you feel that you are no longer creating anything novel or valuable in your day job, and you're wondering how to change things, this book is for you. Anyone using entrepreneurship to create the change they want to see in the world will find a wealth of thought-provoking material, expert advice and practical techniques in these pages and on the accompanying website: www.effectuation.org So, what are you waiting for?

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
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The Optometrist's Guide to Financial Freedom , ...
9,95 € *
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Fueled by the popular and rapidly growing ODsonFinance Facebook community of optometrists and the companion website, co-founders Drs. Dat Bui and Aaron Neufeld created this comprehensive blueprint on techniques to overcome financial obstacles facing optometry students, residents, practicing doctors, and other high-earning professionals. This book strives to teach both young and experienced optometrists financial topics that were never taught in school, ranging from strategies on how to use a high-income salary to attack massive student debt, budgeting and saving for retirement, avoiding predatory advice from financial advisers, using tax strategies to save money, creating passive income, stepping into private practice ownership and how to build wealth through long-term investing in an ever-changing optometric world. Clinical anecdotes and straightforward advice will keep students and new graduates entertained minute after minute while teaching important financial lessons to avoid potential pitfalls. This book will cover topics such as: The harsh reality of optometry and finding the right optometric career for you How to save money while in school and ways to attack student debt How to save for retirement and build wealth for the future through investing and real estate Practice ownership and creating a profitable practice Insurance and tax strategies, and when to hire professional help How to create your own side hustle 1. Language: English. Narrator: Michael Badger. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/170380/bk_acx0_170380_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Found It: A Field Guide for Mom Entrepreneurs ,...
9,95 € *
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A perfect companion for mom entrepreneurs, this guide is brimming with practical advice, tips, and tricks to help a woman fine-tune her self-starter skills and raise a successful company. The lessons here show how to blend motherhood and business, including pointers on how to incorporate kids into the daily business routine and dozens of accounts from mom entrepreneurs on their adventures in time management. It's an indispensable sidekick to launching a dream, keeping it running, and turning it into a thriving business. Jill Salzman is currently growing her third entrepreneurial venture, The Founding Moms, the world's first and only collective of offline meetups and online resources for mom entrepreneurs that was named a Top 100 Website for Entrepreneurs by Forbes. A graduate of Brown University and law school, she started a music management firm and then launched a baby jewelry company before creating her current venture. She's the author of Found It: A Field Guide for Mom Entrepreneurs, a co-host of Inc. Magazine's top-rated entertaining business podcast, Breaking Down Your Business, host of the Tip Top Tips for Entrepreneurs video series, gave her own TED talk on 11/11/11, was dubbed a "mommy mogul" by CNNMoney, a " Cool Mom Entrepreneur We Love" by MSN Live, and she was recently named one of the Top 50 Women to Watch In Tech as well as a Top 100 Champion Small Business Influencer. In her spare time, Jill enjoys kloofing, baking, and erasing her daughters' crayon artwork from the kitchen walls. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Jill Salzman. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/079066/bk_acx0_079066_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Traffic Secrets (eBook, ePUB)
13,95 € *
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Master the evergreen traffic strategies to fill your website and funnels with your dream customers in this timeless book from the $100M entrepreneur and co-founder of the software company ClickFunnels.The biggest problem that most entrepreneurs have isn't creating an amazing product or service; it's getting their future customers to discover that they even exist. Every year, tens of thousands of businesses start and fail because the entrepreneurs don't understand this one essential skill: the art and science of getting tra­ffic (or people) to find you.And that is a tragedy.Traffic Secrets was written to help you get your message out to the world about your products and services. I strongly believe that entrepreneurs are the only people on earth who can actually change the world. It won't happen in government, and I don't think it will happen in schools.It'll happen because of entrepreneurs like you, who are crazy enough to build products and services that will actually change the world. It'll happen because we are crazy enough to risk everything to try and make that dream become a reality.To all the entrepreneurs who fail in their first year of business, what a tragedy it is when the one thing they risked everything for never fully gets to see the light of day.Waiting for people to come to you is not a strategy.Understanding exactly WHO your dream customer is, discovering where they're congregating, and throwing out the hooks that will grab their attention to pull them into your funnels (where you can tell them a story and make them an offer) is the strategy. That's the big secret.Traffic is just people. This book will help you find YOUR people, so you can focus on changing their world with the products and services that you sell.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Traffic Secrets (eBook, ePUB)
13,95 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Master the evergreen traffic strategies to fill your website and funnels with your dream customers in this timeless book from the $100M entrepreneur and co-founder of the software company ClickFunnels.The biggest problem that most entrepreneurs have isn't creating an amazing product or service; it's getting their future customers to discover that they even exist. Every year, tens of thousands of businesses start and fail because the entrepreneurs don't understand this one essential skill: the art and science of getting tra­ffic (or people) to find you.And that is a tragedy.Traffic Secrets was written to help you get your message out to the world about your products and services. I strongly believe that entrepreneurs are the only people on earth who can actually change the world. It won't happen in government, and I don't think it will happen in schools.It'll happen because of entrepreneurs like you, who are crazy enough to build products and services that will actually change the world. It'll happen because we are crazy enough to risk everything to try and make that dream become a reality.To all the entrepreneurs who fail in their first year of business, what a tragedy it is when the one thing they risked everything for never fully gets to see the light of day.Waiting for people to come to you is not a strategy.Understanding exactly WHO your dream customer is, discovering where they're congregating, and throwing out the hooks that will grab their attention to pull them into your funnels (where you can tell them a story and make them an offer) is the strategy. That's the big secret.Traffic is just people. This book will help you find YOUR people, so you can focus on changing their world with the products and services that you sell.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Haskell
69,99 € *
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Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. Product Description Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. This edition includes new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts – such as simple data types and input/output – are presented at an earlier stage. Features + Benefits Emphasises software engineering principles. Encourages a disciplined approach to building reusable libraries of software components. Case studies are used throughout the book to introduce new ideas, illustrate important concepts, and demonstrate how existing techniques work together. Case studies include: An interactive calculator programme. A coding and decoding system. A small queue simulation package. Companion website contains supporting material (such as visualisation tools and a substantial number of web links) to aid further study. Appendices contain information on Hugs errors. Backcover The third edition of Haskell: The Craft of Functional Programming is essential reading for beginners to functional programming and newcomers to the Haskell programming language. The emphasis is on the process of crafting programs and the text contains many examples and running case studies, as well as advice on program design, testing, problem solving and how to avoid common pitfalls. Revisions to this new edition include new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts - such as simple data types and input/output - are presented at an earlier stage. The running example of Pictures is now implemented using web browser graphics as well as lists of strings. The book uses GHCi, the interactive version of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler, as its implementation of choice. It has also been revised to include material about the Haskell Platform, and the Hackage online database of Haskell libraries. In particular, readers are given detailed guidance about how to find their way around what is available in these systems. An accompanying web site supports the book, containing all the program code, further teaching materials and other useful resources. Simon Thompson is Professor of Logic and Computation in the School of Computing at the University of Kent. His research and teaching interests include functional programming and logical aspects of computer science. Simon has written three other books: Erlang Programming (co-authored with Francesco Cesarini), Miranda: The Craft of Functional Programming and Type Theory and Functional Programming. Preface 1 Introducing functional programming 1.1 Computers and modelling 1.2 What is a function? 1.3 Pictures and functions 1.4 Types 1.5 The Haskell programming language 1.6 Expressions and evaluation 1.7 Definitions 1.8 Function definitions 1.9 Types and functional programming 1.10 Calculation and evaluation 1.11 The essence of Haskell programming 1.12 Domain-specific languages 1.13 Two models of Pictures 1.14 Tests, properties and proofs 2 Getting started with Haskell and GHCi 2.1 A first Haskell program 2.2 Using Haskell in practice 2.3 Using GHCi 2.4 The standard prelude and the Haskell libraries 2.5 Modules 2.6 A second example: Pictures 2.7 Errors and error messages 3 Basic types and definitions 3.1 The Booleans: Bool 3.2 The integers: Integer and Int 3.3 Overloading 3.4 Guards 3.5 Characters and strings 3.6 Floating-point numbers: Float 3.7 Syntax 4 Designing and writing programs 4.1 Where do I start? Designing a program in Haskell 4.2 Solving a problem in steps: local definitions 4.3 Defining types for ourselves: enumerated types 4.4 Recursion 4.5 Primitive recursion in practice 4.6 Extended exercise: pictures 4.7 General forms of recursion 4.8 Program testing 5 Data types, tuples and lists 5.1 Introducing tuples and lists 5.2 Tuple types 5.3 Introducing algebraic types 5.4 Our approach to lists 5.5 Lists in Haskell 5.6 List comprehensions 5.7 A library database 6 Programming with lists 6.1 Generic functions: polymorphism 6.2 Haskell list functions in the Prelude 6.3 Finding your way around the Haskell libraries 6.4 The Picture example: implementation 6.5 Extended exercise: alternative implementations of pictures 6.6 Extended exercise: positioned pictures 6.7 Extended exercise: supermarket billing 6.8 Extended exercise: cards and card games 7 Defining functions over lists 7.1 Pattern matching revisited 7.2 Lists and list patterns 7.3 Primitive recursion over lists 7.4 Finding primitive recursive definitions 7.5 General recursions over lists 7.6 Example: text processing 8 Playing the game: I/O in Haskell 8.1 Rock - Paper - Scissors: strategies 8.2 Why is I/O an issue? 8.3 The basics of input/output 8.4 The do notation 8.5 Loops and recursion 8.6 Rock - Paper - Scissors: playing the game 9 Reasoning about programs 9.1 Understanding definitions 9.2 Testing and proof 9.3 Definedness, termination and finiteness 9.4 A little logic 9.6 Further examples of proofs by induction 9.7 Generalizing the proof goal 10 Generalization: patterns of computation 10.1 Patterns of computation over lists 10.2 Higher-order functions: functions as arguments 10.3 Folding and primitive recursion 10.4 Generalizing: splitting up lists 10.5 Case studies revisited 11 Higher-order functions 11.1 Operators: function composition and application 11.2 Expressions for functions: lambda abstractions 11.3 Partial application 11.4 Under the hood: curried functions 11.5 Defining higher-order functions 11.6 Verification and general functions 12 Developing higher-order programs 12.1 Revisiting the Picture example 12.2 Functions as data: strategy combinators 12.3 Functions as data: recognising regular expressions 12.4 Case studies: functions as data 12.5 Example: creating an index 12.6 Development in practice 12.7 Understanding programs 13 Overloading, type classes and type checking 13.1 Why overloading? 13.2 Introducing classes 13.3 Signatures and instances 13.4 A tour of the built-in Haskell classes 13.5 Type checking and type inference: an overview 13.6 Monomorphic type checking 13.7 Polymorphic type checking 13.8 Type checking and classes 14 Algebraic types 14.1 Algebraic type definitions revisited 14.2 Recursive algebraic types 14.3 Polymorphic algebraic types 14.4 Modelling program errors 14.5 Design with algebraic data types 14.6 Algebraic types and type classes 14.7 Reasoning about algebraic types 15 Case study: Huffman codes 15.1 Modules in Haskell 15.2 Modular design 15.3 Coding and decoding 15.4 Implementation – I 15.5 Building Huffman trees 15.6 Design 15.7 Implementation – II 16 Abstract data types 16.1 Type representations 16.2 The Haskell abstract data type mechanism 16.3 Queues 16.4 Design 16.5 Simulation 16.6 Implementing the simulation 16.7 Search trees 16.8 Sets 16.9 Relations and graphs 16.10 Commentary 17 Lazy programming 17.1 Lazy evaluation 17.2 Calculation rules and lazy evaluation 17.3 List comprehensions revisited 17.4 Data-directed programming 17.5 Case study: parsing expressions 17.6 Infinite lists 17.7 Why infinite lists? 17.8 Case study: simulation 17.9 Proof revisited 18 Programming with monads 18.1 I/O programming 18.2 Further I/O 18.3 The calculator 18.4 The do notation revisited 18.5 Monads: languages for functional programming 18.6 Example: monadic computation over trees 19 Domain-Specific Languages 19.1 Programming languages everywhere 19.2 Why DSLs in Haskell? 19.3 Shallow and deep Embeddings 19.4 A DSL for regular expressions 19.5 Monadic DSLs 19.6 DSLs for computation: generating data in QuickCheck 19.7 Taking it further 20 Time and space behaviour 20.1 Complexity of functions 20.2 The complexity of calculations 20.3 Implementations of sets 20.4 Space behaviour 20.5 Folding revisited 20.6 Avoiding recomputation: memoization 21 Conclusion Appendices A Functional, imperative and 00 programming B Glossary C Haskell operators D Haskell practicalities E GHCi errors F Project ideas BibliographyIntroducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
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Haskell
69,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. Product Description Introducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls. Covering basic functional programming, through abstraction to larger scale programming, students are lead step by step through the basics, before being introduced to more advanced topics. This edition includes new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts – such as simple data types and input/output – are presented at an earlier stage. Features + Benefits Emphasises software engineering principles. Encourages a disciplined approach to building reusable libraries of software components. Case studies are used throughout the book to introduce new ideas, illustrate important concepts, and demonstrate how existing techniques work together. Case studies include: An interactive calculator programme. A coding and decoding system. A small queue simulation package. Companion website contains supporting material (such as visualisation tools and a substantial number of web links) to aid further study. Appendices contain information on Hugs errors. Backcover The third edition of Haskell: The Craft of Functional Programming is essential reading for beginners to functional programming and newcomers to the Haskell programming language. The emphasis is on the process of crafting programs and the text contains many examples and running case studies, as well as advice on program design, testing, problem solving and how to avoid common pitfalls. Revisions to this new edition include new material on testing and domain-specific languages and a variety of new examples and case studies, including simple games. Existing material has been expanded and re-ordered, so that some concepts - such as simple data types and input/output - are presented at an earlier stage. The running example of Pictures is now implemented using web browser graphics as well as lists of strings. The book uses GHCi, the interactive version of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler, as its implementation of choice. It has also been revised to include material about the Haskell Platform, and the Hackage online database of Haskell libraries. In particular, readers are given detailed guidance about how to find their way around what is available in these systems. An accompanying web site supports the book, containing all the program code, further teaching materials and other useful resources. Simon Thompson is Professor of Logic and Computation in the School of Computing at the University of Kent. His research and teaching interests include functional programming and logical aspects of computer science. Simon has written three other books: Erlang Programming (co-authored with Francesco Cesarini), Miranda: The Craft of Functional Programming and Type Theory and Functional Programming. Preface 1 Introducing functional programming 1.1 Computers and modelling 1.2 What is a function? 1.3 Pictures and functions 1.4 Types 1.5 The Haskell programming language 1.6 Expressions and evaluation 1.7 Definitions 1.8 Function definitions 1.9 Types and functional programming 1.10 Calculation and evaluation 1.11 The essence of Haskell programming 1.12 Domain-specific languages 1.13 Two models of Pictures 1.14 Tests, properties and proofs 2 Getting started with Haskell and GHCi 2.1 A first Haskell program 2.2 Using Haskell in practice 2.3 Using GHCi 2.4 The standard prelude and the Haskell libraries 2.5 Modules 2.6 A second example: Pictures 2.7 Errors and error messages 3 Basic types and definitions 3.1 The Booleans: Bool 3.2 The integers: Integer and Int 3.3 Overloading 3.4 Guards 3.5 Characters and strings 3.6 Floating-point numbers: Float 3.7 Syntax 4 Designing and writing programs 4.1 Where do I start? Designing a program in Haskell 4.2 Solving a problem in steps: local definitions 4.3 Defining types for ourselves: enumerated types 4.4 Recursion 4.5 Primitive recursion in practice 4.6 Extended exercise: pictures 4.7 General forms of recursion 4.8 Program testing 5 Data types, tuples and lists 5.1 Introducing tuples and lists 5.2 Tuple types 5.3 Introducing algebraic types 5.4 Our approach to lists 5.5 Lists in Haskell 5.6 List comprehensions 5.7 A library database 6 Programming with lists 6.1 Generic functions: polymorphism 6.2 Haskell list functions in the Prelude 6.3 Finding your way around the Haskell libraries 6.4 The Picture example: implementation 6.5 Extended exercise: alternative implementations of pictures 6.6 Extended exercise: positioned pictures 6.7 Extended exercise: supermarket billing 6.8 Extended exercise: cards and card games 7 Defining functions over lists 7.1 Pattern matching revisited 7.2 Lists and list patterns 7.3 Primitive recursion over lists 7.4 Finding primitive recursive definitions 7.5 General recursions over lists 7.6 Example: text processing 8 Playing the game: I/O in Haskell 8.1 Rock - Paper - Scissors: strategies 8.2 Why is I/O an issue? 8.3 The basics of input/output 8.4 The do notation 8.5 Loops and recursion 8.6 Rock - Paper - Scissors: playing the game 9 Reasoning about programs 9.1 Understanding definitions 9.2 Testing and proof 9.3 Definedness, termination and finiteness 9.4 A little logic 9.6 Further examples of proofs by induction 9.7 Generalizing the proof goal 10 Generalization: patterns of computation 10.1 Patterns of computation over lists 10.2 Higher-order functions: functions as arguments 10.3 Folding and primitive recursion 10.4 Generalizing: splitting up lists 10.5 Case studies revisited 11 Higher-order functions 11.1 Operators: function composition and application 11.2 Expressions for functions: lambda abstractions 11.3 Partial application 11.4 Under the hood: curried functions 11.5 Defining higher-order functions 11.6 Verification and general functions 12 Developing higher-order programs 12.1 Revisiting the Picture example 12.2 Functions as data: strategy combinators 12.3 Functions as data: recognising regular expressions 12.4 Case studies: functions as data 12.5 Example: creating an index 12.6 Development in practice 12.7 Understanding programs 13 Overloading, type classes and type checking 13.1 Why overloading? 13.2 Introducing classes 13.3 Signatures and instances 13.4 A tour of the built-in Haskell classes 13.5 Type checking and type inference: an overview 13.6 Monomorphic type checking 13.7 Polymorphic type checking 13.8 Type checking and classes 14 Algebraic types 14.1 Algebraic type definitions revisited 14.2 Recursive algebraic types 14.3 Polymorphic algebraic types 14.4 Modelling program errors 14.5 Design with algebraic data types 14.6 Algebraic types and type classes 14.7 Reasoning about algebraic types 15 Case study: Huffman codes 15.1 Modules in Haskell 15.2 Modular design 15.3 Coding and decoding 15.4 Implementation – I 15.5 Building Huffman trees 15.6 Design 15.7 Implementation – II 16 Abstract data types 16.1 Type representations 16.2 The Haskell abstract data type mechanism 16.3 Queues 16.4 Design 16.5 Simulation 16.6 Implementing the simulation 16.7 Search trees 16.8 Sets 16.9 Relations and graphs 16.10 Commentary 17 Lazy programming 17.1 Lazy evaluation 17.2 Calculation rules and lazy evaluation 17.3 List comprehensions revisited 17.4 Data-directed programming 17.5 Case study: parsing expressions 17.6 Infinite lists 17.7 Why infinite lists? 17.8 Case study: simulation 17.9 Proof revisited 18 Programming with monads 18.1 I/O programming 18.2 Further I/O 18.3 The calculator 18.4 The do notation revisited 18.5 Monads: languages for functional programming 18.6 Example: monadic computation over trees 19 Domain-Specific Languages 19.1 Programming languages everywhere 19.2 Why DSLs in Haskell? 19.3 Shallow and deep Embeddings 19.4 A DSL for regular expressions 19.5 Monadic DSLs 19.6 DSLs for computation: generating data in QuickCheck 19.7 Taking it further 20 Time and space behaviour 20.1 Complexity of functions 20.2 The complexity of calculations 20.3 Implementations of sets 20.4 Space behaviour 20.5 Folding revisited 20.6 Avoiding recomputation: memoization 21 Conclusion Appendices A Functional, imperative and 00 programming B Glossary C Haskell operators D Haskell practicalities E GHCi errors F Project ideas BibliographyIntroducing functional programming in the Haskell language, this book is written for students and programmers with little or no experience. It emphasises the process of crafting programmes, problem solving and avoiding common programming pitfalls.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 06.04.2020
Zum Angebot